Psycomedia Episode 52 – Little Blue Penguin’s Autoerotic Asphyxiation vs Omnipresent Freddy Mercury

Psycomedia Episode 52 – Little Blue Penguin’s Autoerotic Asphyxiation vs Omnipresent Freddy Mercury

References:

Auslander, P. (1998). Seeing is believing: Live performance and the discourse of authenticity in rock culture. Literature and psychology44, 1-26.

Ted Baumhauer, “Little Blue Penguins: Tales for Making the Transition to Leadership”

Bond, C. F., & Titus, L. J. (1983). Social facilitation: A meta-analysis of 241 studies. Psychological Bulletin; Psychological Bulletin, 94(2), 265.

Bronstein, P. M. (1994). Siamese Fighting Fish. The Dynamics of Aggression: Biological and Social Processes in Dyads and Groups, p113.

Brosnan, S. F., & de Waal, F. (2002). Regulation of vocal output by chimpanzees finding food in the presence or absence of an audience. Evolution of communication, 4(2), 211-224.

De Castro, J. M. (1994). Family and friends produce greater social facilitation of food intake than other companions. Physiology & Behavior, 56(3), 445-455.

Di Bitetti, M. S. (2005). Food-associated calls and audience effects in tufted capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella nigritus. Animal behaviour, 69(4), 911-919.

Doutrelant, C., McGregor, P. K., & Oliveira, R. F. (2001). The effect of an audience on intrasexual communication in male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. Behavioral Ecology, 12(3), 283-286.

Doutrelant, C., & McGREGOR, P. K. (2000). Eavesdropping and mate choice in female fighting fish. Behaviour, 1655-1669.

Dzieweczynski, T. L., Earley, R. L., Green, T. M., & Rowland, W. J. (2005). Audience effect is context dependent in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. Behavioral Ecology, 16(6), 1025-1030.

Dzieweczynski, T. L., Eklund, A. C., & Rowland, W. J. (2006). Male 11-ketotestosterone levels change as a result of being watched in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. General and comparative endocrinology, 147(2), 184-189.

Dzieweczynski, T. L., Bessler, A. M., Shelton, D. S., & Rowland, W. J. (2006). Effect of a dummy audience on male–male interactions in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. Ethology, 112(2), 127-133.

Huguet, P., Galvaing, M. P., Monteil, J. M., & Dumas, F. (1999). Social presence effects in the Stroop task: further evidence for an attentional view of social facilitation. Journal of personality and social psychology, 77(5), 1011.

Kimble, C. E., & Rezabek, J. S. (1992). Playing games before an audience: Social facilitation or choking. Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, 20(2), 115-120.

McGregor, P. K., Peake, T. M., & Lampe, H. M. (2001). Fighting fish Betta splendens extract relative information from apparent interactions: what happens when what you see is not what you get. Animal Behaviour, 62(6), 1059-1065.

Miyazaki, M., & Waas, J. R. (2003). Acoustic properties of male advertisement and their impact on female responsiveness in little penguins Eudyptula minor. Journal of avian biology, 34(3), 229-232.

Miyazaki, M., & Waas, J. R. (2002). Correlations between body size, defensive behaviour and reproductive success in male Little Blue Penguins Eudyptula minor: implications for female choice. Ibis, 145(1), 98-105.

Nakagawa, S., Waas, J. R., & Miyazaki, M. (2001). Heart rate changes reveal that little blue penguin chicks (Eudyptula minor) can use vocal signatures to discriminate familiar from unfamiliar chicks. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 50(2), 180-188.

Peberdy, D. (2013). Playing with the Self: Celebrity Autoerotic Asphyxiation

Thompson, T. I. (1963). Visual reinforcement in Siamese fighting fish. Science; Science.

Udell, M. A., Dorey, N. R., & Wynne, C. D. (2011). Can your dog read your mind? Understanding the causes of canine perspective taking. Learning & behavior, 39(4), 289-302.

Verbeek, P., Iwamoto, T., & Murakami, N. (2007). Differences in aggression between wild-type and domesticated fighting fish are context dependent. Animal behaviour, 73(1), 75-83.

Waas, J. R. (1988). Acoustic displays facilitate courtship in little blue penguins, Eudyptula minor. Animal behaviour, 36(2), 366-371.

Waas, J. R. (1991). Do little blue penguins signal their intentions during aggressive interactions with strangers?. Animal Behaviour, 41(3), 375-382.

Waas, J. R. (1991). The risks and benefits of signalling aggressive motivation: a study of cave-dwelling little blue penguins. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 29(2), 139-146.

Waas, J. R. (1990). Intraspecific variation in social repertoires: evidence from cave-and burrow-dwelling little blue penguins. Behaviour, 63-99.

This is the best the internet can do with a bear wearing a tie, for presumably obvious reasons:

Again, the internet somewhat disappoints with metal covers of G&S, but there is this:

Some Pappy’s Sketches (from their greatest hits which they did before Last Show Ever):

Ben’s Bear, Bjoffi:

Ben’s new haircut:

Media of the Week:

Acts of Caine: Act of Atonement:

Caine Black Knife (Acts of Caine)

Caine’s Law (Acts of Caine: Act of Atonement, Book 2)

Primal Carnage:

http://www.primalcarnage.com/website/

A rigorous academic comparison of The Beatles and the Monkees:

Authenticity via looping:

Live vs. Sampled:

 vs. 

The context for Tim’s reaction to Kimball:

This photoshop of Barack Obama playing pinball exists:

The Siamese Fighting Fish: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siamese_fighting_fish

The best song from the second season of Flight of the Conchords which also apparently describes the behaviour of Fighting Fish:

And then gender-swapping it makes it really really weird:

An Emperor Penguin:

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One Response to Psycomedia Episode 52 – Little Blue Penguin’s Autoerotic Asphyxiation vs Omnipresent Freddy Mercury

  1. Sam says:

    Regarding the advantage or disadvantage from having an audience, it seems like it would matter how difficult the activity seems, because with a sufficiently challenging task the participant could fail utterly without losing face because the presumption would be that the people in the audience would do as poorly. The Stroop task, while challenging, seems like it should be very simple, so there would be more pressure not to look bad by saying the wrong word.

    In my youth, I had a Betta fish and a couple rats. I never had a control, so I did not perform experiments with them, so I cannot attest to their similarities as test subjects. The rats seemed nicer, so the fish is probably a better choice if your experiment is likely to be unpleasant.

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